Avoid FIXERS! Here’s how you can get your Driver’s License Philippines

Here’s how you can get your Driver’s License Philippines

Fixers are the ones who will approach you and tell you they will fast track your application with fees higher than the normal rate. Their charges vary, some asks P700.00 for the student license, P2,500.00 for non-professional license and P3,500.00 for the Professional license. The normal processing time will take 3-4 hours (TIP: Go early to avoid the long queue) while fixers can cut it  1 hour to 1 and half hour only. This might seem convenient but it is “Legal but Fake”. Licenses acquired through the fixers are physically legal but not under the law. If one wants to check his record in the LTO Management Information Division, no records of his information will be shown.

In his term, President Rodrigo Duterte demanded the appointed officials of Land Transportation Office and other government agencies to vacate their posts due to continuous corruption. It is known that LTO is one of the most corrupt offices in the Philippines.

We are all wanting to have something good for our country, let us not contribute to the growing number of the individuals hindering that good change.

To get a non-pro driver’s license, you first need to get a Student Permit as it is a prerequisite document.

Here are the things needed to get one:

  • You must be at least 17 years old. Mentally and Physically fit to drive.
  • Original copy and photocopy of birth certificate
  • Accomplished application form for driver’s license – You can download the form here.
  • If already employed: Tax Identification Number (TIN)

Once you have your complete requirements, go to the nearest LTO branch:

  • Go to the Customer Service to get your queue number and checklist.
  • Your number will be called and you will proceed to the Evaluator counter to submit your requirements which will be checked for authenticity.
  • Sit and wait until your name is called for photo and signature.
  • Go to the cashier and pay the fees. (TIP: make sure to get the OR)
    • Student Permit fee – P150.00
    • Application Fee – P100.00
    • Computer Fee – P67.63
    • Total – P317.63

For Non-Professional and Professional Driver’s License

Here are the things needed:

  • You must be at least 18 years old. Mentally and Physically fit to drive.
  • Accomplished application form for driver’s license – You can download the form here.
  • Valid student permit (at least 1-month-old)
  • Medical certificate with OR from any licensed physician, not more than 15 days old.
  • Negative drug test result from any DOH accredited drug test center or government hospital.
  • Passed written and practical exam.
  • If already employed: Tax Identification Number (TIN)
    • For Professional Driver’s License
      • NBI Clearance, Police or Court clearance.
      • For Heavy vehicles, bring 1-year-old valid non-professional driver’s license.

NOTE: Bring all the complete requirements to avoid problems.

Once you have your complete requirements, go to the nearest LTO branch:

  • Go to the Customer Service to get your queue number and checklist.
  • Your number will be called and you will proceed to the Evaluator counter to submit your requirements which will be checked for authenticity.
  • Sit and wait until your name is called for photo and signature.
  • Go to the cashier and pay the fees. (TIP: make sure to get the OR)
    • First Cashier Payment
      • Application fee – P100.00
      • Computer fee – P67.63
      • Total – P167.63
  • Go to the examination room for lecture and written exam.
  • After passing the written test, you will be called to do the practical driving test.
  • Pay the License and Computer fee. (TIP: make sure to get the OR)
    • Second Cashier Payment
      • License fee – P350.00
      • Computer fee – P67.63
      • Total – P417.63
  • Lastly, proceed to the releasing counter with your OR and claim your permit.

Those who failed the Practical driving test twice will not be allowed to apply again in a period of one year.

It is better to be safe than sorry.

Source: Land Transportation Office

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